No need to panic buy bottled water in Norwich


Fretting about the bottled shortage gripping the region? Don’t worry here is a blindingly obvious solution to the ‘crisis’: “Get a glass of water from the tap.”

Supermarket shelves have run dry with water not making it on to lorries amid the HGV driver shortage. 

But there is good news … the humble kitchen tap can solve the issue and more – shock horror! 

And Norwich’s water is among the best there is. 

A spokeswoman for the East’s water supplier confirmed the stuff that comes out of our taps is some of the finest in the country. 


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“Water quality is regulated by the Drinking Water Inspectorate. This body makes sure all water companies supply safe drinking water that meets legal standards and is acceptable to consumers,” and Anglian Water spokeswoman said.

“Last month, the DWI issued a report in which our performance was singled out as exemplary against all the key water quality measures.

“All of the water in the Anglian Water region is classed as hard to very hard. 

“Hard water is perfectly safe and there’s lots of evidence it can even be good for you. Calcium is vital for healthy growth. It is found in many types of foods and hard drinking water can actually contribute towards your daily calcium intake.”

The shortage comes after freight space has been in increasingly short supply during the pingdemic. 

Industry insiders have confirmed that heavy, bulky items like water which push up the lorry’s weight are not being prioritised. 

On top of that, the hot weather has meant more of the stock is being bought, thus making shelves emptier. 

H2Wow! Five facts you didn’t know about Norwich’s water 

1. Norwich has hard water

Water is clarified as being hard or soft dependent on its calcium carbonate and magnesium levels at quantities over 120 parts per million.

Norfolk as a whole has around 300ppm or higher. 

2. This makes water taste more minerally

The water found in Norwich is most closely related to Evian and Fiji water as its bottled counterpart. Both are hard waters and are mineral rich – giving it a slightly salty flavour. 

3. It takes longer to make a cup of tea

Because of the mineral content in the water it takes longer for it to boil, hence adding a second or two on to your kettle’s heating time. 

4. It’s good news for plants

Calcium and magnesium can be very beneficial for plant growth. 

5. It’s also good news for you

Hard water also contains higher levels of iron and magnese, meaning that not only is the calcium content good for bones and teeth, it’s good for growth and metabolism.



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