Will we help one another when the water runs out?


FILE. Letter writer says, 'I applaud Cynthia Tucker's column 'Floods, fires and climate denialism,' July 27, which was an aggregation of the horrific global weather events taking place around the world.' (Will Waldron/Times Union)

FILE. Letter writer says, ‘I applaud Cynthia Tucker’s column ‘Floods, fires and climate denialism,’ July 27, which was an aggregation of the horrific global weather events taking place around the world.’ (Will Waldron/Times Union)

Will Waldron/Times Union

I applaud Cynthia Tucker’s column “Floods, fires and climate denialism,” July 27, which was an aggregation of the horrific global weather events taking place around the world. Still, it can be hard to believe anything is really wrong here in upstate New York, when the sun is out and it’s warm.

In my experience, when a problem is so big and the implications so devastating, it can help to focus on just one aspect. Here’s the one I focus on with climate change. Only half a percent of the earth’s water is fresh and available to us as drinking water. Excessive heat, changing rainfall patterns and more rapid evaporation are disrupting the natural processes that replenish water supplies. Today, nearly half the people in the world experience water scarcity. Here in upstate New York with the fresh water abundance of our Great Lakes and Finger Lakes, that possibility can feel far away. But the pandemic has shown us that things we never thought could happen here, can.

I ask myself, “When the water runs short, will we have the generosity of spirit, and the effective leadership required to ensure everyone gets their share?” After the events of the last year and a half, the answer terrifies me.

Diane Stefani


Conklin
Climate Reality Project Volunteer Leader



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